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Sunday, October 11, 2020 | History

6 edition of Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culture found in the catalog.

Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culture

by Linda Hurcombe

  • 196 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Routledge .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Number of Pages320
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7491445M
ISBN 100415320925
ISBN 109780415320924

  The term “culture” entered archaeology through 19th century German ethnography, where the Kultur of tribal groups and rural peasants was distinguished from the Zivilisation of urbanized was used by German ethnologists to designate the distinctive ways of life of a particular people or Volk.. The idea of archaeological cultures became central to the discipline in the 20th. The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem marks a watershed in Islamic material culture, as among other things, it also provides evidence of a new sense of artistic ambition among the Muslim elite. Next, the chapter assesses changes in the countryside with particular emphasis on the elite country residences (qusur) of Greater Syria and the evolution of Cited by: 6.

Mapping material culture: exploring the interface between museum artefacts and their geographical context Book reviews, a distinctive feature of the journal since its establishment (as the Glasgow Archaeological Journal) in , provide a critical perspective on Scottish archaeology and a well-established forum for scholarly debate. In Cited by: 1. In this book, Ellen Swift uses design theory, previously neglected in Roman archaeology, to investigate Roman artifacts in a new way, making a significant contribution to both Roman social history and our understanding of the relationships that exist between artefacts and people.

She has published two books with Routledge on Archaeological Artefacts as Material Culture and Perishable Material Culture in Prehistory: investigating the missing majority. She has recently co-edited and contributed three chapters to The Life-Cycle of Structures in Experimental Archaeology: an object biography approach with Sidestone Press. Archaeology, or archeology, is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts and cultural landscapes. Archaeology can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.


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Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culture by Linda Hurcombe Download PDF EPUB FB2

Drawing on a range of different cultures and extensively illustrated, Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culture covers everything from recovery strategies and recording procedures to interpretation through typology, ethnography and ex This book is an introduction to the study of artefacts, setting them in a social context rather than using a /5(11).

This book is an introduction to the study of artefacts, setting them in a social context rather than using a purely scientific approach. Drawing on a range of different cultures and extensively illustrated, Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culture covers everything from recovery strategies and recording procedures to interpretation through typology, ethnography and experiment, and every Cited by: Drawing on a range of different cultures and extensively illustrated, Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culture covers everything from recovery strategies and recording procedures to interpretation through typology, ethnography and experiment, and every type of material including wood, fibers, bones, hides and adhesives, stone, clay, and metals.

Drawing on a range of different cultures and extensively illustrated, Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culture covers everything from recovery strategies and recording procedures to. This is a very useful book for students who plan to specialize in historic archaeology in North America.

The articles tend to be very specific - "Glass Bottle Push-Ups and Pontil Marks" and "The Role of Pewter as Missing Artifact" - and I doubt that the average reader will have much interest in details of aluminum can construction or how to 4/5(2).

Archaeology, or archeology (from Greek ἀρχαιολογία, archaiologia – ἀρχαῖος, arkhaīos, "ancient"; and -λογία, -logiā, "-logy"), is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture and environmental data which they have left behind, which includes artefacts, architecture, biofacts and cultural landscapes Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culture book.

Drawing on a range of different cultures and extensively illustrated, Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culture covers everything from recovery strategies and recording procedures to interpretation through typology, ethnography and experiment, and every type of material including wood, fibers, bones, hides and adhesives, stone, clay, and : Linda Hurcombe.

Material culture is a term used in archaeology and other anthropology-related fields to refer to all the corporeal, tangible objects that are created, used, kept and left behind by past and present cultures.

Material culture refers to objects that are used, lived in. Archaeology is the study of past cultures through the material (physical) remains people left behind. These can range from small artifacts, such as arrowheads, to large buildings, such as pyramids. Anything that people created or modified is part of the archaeological Size: KB.

importance of material culture can also be attributed to the absence of its counter part i.e. non-material culture of the prehistoric times.

The present paper analyses the issues pertaining to the interpretation of material culture in archaeological inquiry. It is argued here that an in-depth and cultural interpretation of artefacts is.

Oxbow Books is the world's leading publisher, distributor and bookseller in archaeology and the ancient world. Skip to main contentAuthor: Björn Nilsson. Get this from a library. Archaeological artefacts as material culture.

[L M Hurcombe] -- This is an introduction to the study of artefacts, setting them in a social context rather than using a purely scientific approach. It draws on a range of different cultures and is extensively.

Book Description. Artifacts are hybrids, both natural and cultural. They are also an essential component in the process of human evolution. In recent years, a wide range of disciplines, including cognitive science, sociology, art history, and anthropology, have all grappled with the nature of artifacts, leading to the emergence of a renewed interdisciplinary focus on material culture.

Publisher Summary. This chapter focuses on archaeology's relationship to the present and the past. Once the material dug up is presented to the public, the entire presentation, not just the actual facts about the past, or excavation, or analytical techniques, becomes an entirely new artifact, a piece of modern material culture, one to be analyzed for what it tells about the culture creating it.

Book review of Hurcombe, Archaeological Artefacts as Material Culture. Archaeology and Folklore of Material Culture, Ritual, and Everyday Life Amy Gazin-Schwartz1 Archaeologists often make distinctions between ritual material culture and everyday or utilitarian material culture. I examine this differentiation model for understanding the complex relationships among material culture, ritual, and everyday Size: 62KB.

World Archaeology 36(4) Hurcombe, L. Archaeological Artefacts as Material Culture. London: Routledge. Hurcombe, L. A sense of materials and sensory perception in concepts of materiality.

World Archaeology Jeffra, C. ‘Hair and potters: an experimental look at temper’ World Archaeology 40(1)   Archaeologists often make distinctions between ritual material culture and everyday or utilitarian material culture.

I examine this differentiation model for understanding the complex relationships among material culture, ritual, and everyday life.

Using folklore recorded in Scotland in the seventeenth to twentieth centuries, I suggest another, continuum-based model, and suggest how this Cited by: Archaeologists are synonymous with artifacts.

With artifacts we construct stories concerning past lives and livelihoods, yet we rarely write of deeply personal encounters or of the way the lives of objects and our lives become enmeshed. In this volume, 23 archaeologists each tell an intimate story of their experience and entanglement with an evocative artifact.

5 Week 2: Technology, Teknos and Material Culture Underpinning the production of artifacts is the connection between humans and their respective technologies. In this class we will try to define technology and find a useful.Material culture is the aspect of social reality grounded in the objects and architecture that surround people.

It includes the usage, consumption, creation, and trade of objects as well as the behaviors, norms, and rituals that the objects create or take part in.Drawing on a range of different cultures and extensively illustrated, Archaeological Artefacts and Material Culturecovers everything from recovery strategies and recording procedures to interpretation through typology, ethnography and experiment, and every type of material including wood, fibers, bones, hides and adhesives, stone, clay, and metals.